What can you buy for $1 million in Silicon Valley?

With soaring housing prices in Silicon Valley, newcomers and folks potentially relocating here may wonder what can you buy for $1 million or less in Silicon Valley? This article will provide a snapshot in time and provide a sense of whether your million dollar budget can get you into a house, a townhouse, or a condo – or perhaps “none of the above” – on the valley floor.

(Homes in the Los Gatos or Santa Cruz Mountains are generally more affordable, but will of course be farther out and are generally considered a specialty market. Not included will be mobile homes, as the space rents are often close to or more than $1,000 per month. Also not included are duplexes, which you’d be hard pressed to find many of under that $1 million mark.)

If you absolutely must buy a house, and the budget must be under $1 million…

If you absolutely must have a house or single family home, as opposed to a condominium or townhouse, there are a number of areas for you to consider in Santa Clara County, including

  • Gilroy
  • Morgan Hill
  • Milpitas
  • Certain districts in San Jose
    • Alum Rock
    • South San Jose
    • Evergreen
    • Berryessa
    • Downtown and Central San Jose
    • Santa Teresa
    • and Alviso (including County pockets)
  • the Los Gatos 95033 (mountains) area – which is vast and contains many small communities

The Los Gatos mountains area varies in price from one community to the next and right now that is a hopping market, I’m told. You can find information, including a list of mountain neighborhoods, on the page linked as well as the occasional market update. If you’re interested in buying or selling a mountain home here in the Bay Area, please reach out! I do some work in the mountains, and if it’s not a match I am happy to connect nice folks with trusted Realtors that are mountain market specialists.

To determine where someone could get into a house for under $1,000,000, I pulled the sales from the last 90 days (as of August 31, 2021) and looked at how many of the sales of houses for any given area were under that budget amount.  In many places, there were zero – even if I looked back a full year!  The areas below are listed in order of the average sale price for these “in budget” properties, though you might prefer to rank them by the average square footage or some other criteria.

Silicon Valley homes for under $1 million: houses

(Trouble reading the image above? Click to view the full-sized photo.)

This doesn’t mean you can’t find something under $1mil elsewhere. San Jose’s Almaden Valley, Willow Glen, and Cambrian areas each had one sale under the million-dollar mark during the same time period, but these sales are significantly less common. When you see ratios of something like 3% or less of the houses sold are under that price point, it’s important to understand that those homes may be major fixer uppers, tear downs, or have a location issue or some other big challenge. But – perhaps you are handy, do not mind the property condition, location, extremely small size, or whatever the presenting issue may be.

Areas in Santa Clara County where a house is possible but unlikely, but a townhouse or condominium may work:

(more…)

Moving to Silicon Valley: is it possible to get a house here that’s as nice as the one you currently own?

I am frequently contacted by extremely bright, successful engineers or high tech professionals who are in large homes on large lots with great schools in less expensive areas of the country.  They want to move here because Silicon Valley is the hub of innovation, our weather’s great, crime’s low and there’s so much to do in this region.  They know that housing costs here are extraordinarily high, but they hope that the salaries are commensurately high such that they can replicate the home & lifestyle they currently have – but put it here.

But that really doesn’t work.  Unless someone’s relocating here from Boston, New York, Tokyo or Paris (or somewhere equally astronomically priced), the salary offered in Silicon Valley will not usually make that kind of housing duplication possible.

I’m sorry.

To move here normally means downgrading the house and paying more for it.  Yes, incomes are a little higher but not nearly enough to match the discrepancy in real estate prices.  I tell people, as a rule of thumb, that when you move here you will pay twice as much and get half as much.  (Salaries? You get a little more.  Not twice.)

Sometimes I get the comment “I don’t want to move to Silicon Valley and have my family’s lifestyle negatively impacted by having to live in a smaller house.  I want the quality of life to go up, not down.”

That is completely understandable.  People who move here don’t do it because of housing.  Lifestyle often is better here.  Shoveling snow? Forgetaboutit.  We have 300 sunny days a year on average – if you love to be outdoors, your lifestyle will be far better here where the weather is subtropical.  We have the Pacific Ocean an hour or less away, San Francisco an hour away, about 2 dozen wineries, theatre, museums, the Sharks, parks and trails.  Our population is highly diverse and highly educated.  Crime is low.  There are a thousand reasons why the lifestyle here probably is far better than in other parts of the country… but it’s not if you equivocate housing with lifestyle.

How is buying a home in Silicon Valley different from in other parts of the country?

Yesterday I was asked how the San Jose – Silicon Valley area is different from other parts of the US for home buyers.  What did they need to be concerned about here versus in the midwest or east coast? They knew about earthquakes, and having to strap water heaters for earthquake safety, but what about earthquake insurance? Are termites a problem here?  What things should home buyers worry about here that perhaps are not issues elsewhere?

I thought that this was a great question.  Here are the big areas that come to mind:

  1. Earthquakes (of course) and everything related: selling requirements, insurance questions, related natural hazard zones (liquifaction zones, landslide areas, etc.), where fault lines are located, etc.  People moving to California generally know that they need to be concerned about seismic occurrences, but perhaps not all the related areas.
  2. Expansive clay soils: when you read your history, you may have heard that in early California, homes were made of adobe bricks.  What may not have been clear is how strong that soil is. I have a couple of blog posts on my Valley of Hearts Delight blog on this topic:
    Cracked Foundations, Adobe Clay Soils and Water in Silicon ValleyWhat To Consider When Buying a Hillside Home in Silicon Valley
  3. Termites: in general, there are 2 types of these pests active on the valley floor: drywood termites and subterranean termites. (In the Los Gatos Mountains and closer to the Pacific Ocean you may also encounter dampwood termites.)  It may be possible to try to prevent subterranean termites with bait stakes placed underground, but there is no way to prevent drywood termites.  You can fumigate your home and within a few days they could be back (but won’t be visible for a year or two at the earliest in most cases).  Termites do better here than in many places of the country simply because it’s warmer here.  They may swarm twice a year rather than once.  Please also read this post for more info:

    How Often Should You Get A Termite Inspection?

  4. Houses:

    • No basements – there are very few homes with basements here (the very old ones and those which are newer and extremely expensive).  A very common question is “where do people store all their stuff if they don’t have a basement?”  For most households, the storage center tends to be the garage.  Built in cabinets and storage shelves are highly appreciated.  When people purchase homes with 3 car garages, often that 3rd space is not for a car, but for “stuff” – luggage, holiday decor, momentos, old files, etc.
    • Foundations – older homes are usually built on a “raised” foundation or perimeter foundation with support beams under the center part of the home.  Some types of homes, such as Eichler designed houses (mid-century modern ranch style) were built with slab foundations and actually have radiant heating (heating coils built into the slab).  Newer homes now tend to be built on slab also (10-15 years of age or less).  Most of our valley has 40-60 year old ranch style homes, though, and these are mostly “raised” foundations with a crawl space.
    • Houses are built to move in case of an earthquake – most of our homes are built with wood and are intended to move in the case of an earthquake.  It is very rare to find a house made out of brick here because they don’t do well in case of severe shaking.

These are perhaps the most salient differences home buyers relocating to Silicon Valley might want to be aware of.  For each of these points, there are things to learn and red flags to watch for.