Mary Pope-Handy

Is it better to rent for awhile, or purchase a home when you first move to Silicon Valley?

Buy or rent firstIs it a good idea for newcomers to Silicon Valley to rent for a year, or smarter for them to purchase right away? There are many factors to consider, and even more if you are coming from another state or country.

Normally, I would suggest deciding where you want to live generally (example, Almaden area of San Jose 95120) and renting there for a bit first just to make sure it’s where you want to be. This is especially true if you have children who will be in public schools, as it can be rough on them if they change again once you’ve been here for awhile. Renting first enables you to learn the area and takes some pressure off. Also, it can take some time to move money from overseas for your down payment, so the little extra time can help there, too.

However, many people want to buy immediately and will make several trips here before the move to find and purchase a home. Often this is because they see the value in owning (tax benefits, getting kids into certain schools). I’ve had many people tell me that it helps them to establish themselves in their new community faster if they buy rather than rent.

The current market remains an impacted, strong seller’s market which has refused to let up over the last few years. With home prices trending on a seemingly endless climb, some buyers are clamoring to purchase before prices rise higher. Other potential buyers sometimes try to rent with the plan to sit out the storm until the market has cooled, but high demand has raised rental costs as well, and there’s no knowing how long it will take for the market to correct, or if it will ever correct below the current trend. For this reason, trying to wait-out the market involves a huge risk.

Back in 2013, when I originally published this post, there was a lot of focus on mortgage interest rates, which were very favorable at the time, hovering between 4.125 and 4.25%. Since most buyers use mortgage loans, the interest rate can be a big factor in budgeting the purchase. To understand the impact, let’s compare the 2013 numbers with the predicted rise that was given for 2014 to 5.4% interest.

What does this rise in interest rates mean in terms of housing affordability?

$500,000 mortgage, 30 year fixed at 4.25% = monthly payment of $2459

$500,000 mortgage, 30 year fixed at 5.4% = monthly payment of $2807

Difference = $348, or a 14% increase in the monthly payment

Or, let’s look at it in terms of buying power.

$2500 mortgage payment, 30 year term at 4.25% = loan amount of $508,192

$2500 mortgage payment, 30 year term at 5.4% = loan amount of $445,211

To summarize, a rise of interest from 4.25% to 5.4% cuts into the buying power of a $2,500 payment to the tune of almost $63,000.

For most people, the cost of waiting is a significant factor in this buy vs rent decision. My concern is that many people who elect to lease or rent for a year do not understand the risk that may accompany waiting. For most folks relocating to the San Jose or Peninsula area, the hardest thing to manage is the cost of housing. This could become substantially worse by putting off the purchase for a year, so right now I cannot recommend doing that.

Want more info?  Please see my Valley of Heart’s Delight blog, with the related article
How will rising interest rates impact your home buying power?

Should you find your Realtor first or your lender first? Should they know each other?

A bad lenderIt’s an old question – should you find your Realtor first or your lender first? I would like to suggest that you find your Realtor first, and then ask your real estate agent for a list of reputable, trusted loan agents or lenders.

Why?

Because as with all professionals, lenders (and Realtors) are not created equally.

You will probably spend a LOT more time with your Realtor in viewing homes, reviewing disclosures, writing the contract, meeting inspectors, and so on – so I do suggest that you begin by very carefully choosing the right real estate licensee or broker for yourself. A good Realtor can probably give you between 3 and 10 names of trusted, reputable, reliable, knowledgeable lenders. From there you can interview and choose someone.

It is extremely important that your lender be good at what he or she does. A bad lender – and there are many of them – could cost you the sale, but definitely will create undue stress, will waste your time and ultimately cost you money. This is no exaggeration.

In our hot Silicon Valley real estate market, when there are multiple offers, many listing agents will phone the buyer’s lender to see how solid the buyers are and how decent the lender seems to be. The better loan agents will answer the phone when called – because they are anticipating the call. The lesser ones are not paying attention and don’t pick up. That small decision, one way or the other, can be critical! A few years back, I spoke with a high powered agent out of Saratoga who told me of this very scenario. She concluded “the lender who didn’t take my call cost the buyer the sale.” Yes, it matters that much.

A poorly organized loan agent may misplace documentation, causing you to miss work so that you can get it to him or her again in a rush (under pressure of the loan contingency removal date). I have known buyers to lose time from work due to the ineptitude of a loan agent (but not one that I suggested).

All deadlines must be agreed to by buyers and sellers in writing, no exceptions. Can you imagine what it’s like to ask your lender how many days will be needed for the loan contingency, only to have to extend it not once, but a few times, because it’s just not done yet? A lousy lender will make this happen. Sometimes they are submitting loan packages based on old guidelines rather than current ones. You and I won’t be involved at that microscopic level – but if the lender messes up, we’ll hear about it later.

In the worst case scenarios, a really terrible mortgage banker or broker will cause so many delays that you close escrow late, causing you, the buyer, to pay some of the seller’s coverage costs. If the rates go up during all of the delays, you may pay a  higher interest rate too.

That’s the gloom and doom of it.

In my real estate practice, often about half of my clients come to me with their own lender. Although this is not ideal (it’s better if the Realtor and lender go into it with a good working relationship), often it works out OK. But sometimes it’s a train wreck. This doesn’t happen, at least not in my experience, if you get a lender I’ve already vetted. Or if you’re working with another great Silicon Valley Realtor, one that he or she has screened. I would not suggest someone incompetent or who will screw up the transaction – of that you can be sure! I want you to buy your home as much as you do, and I want it to be as smooth and hassle free as possible. A bad lender can put all of that in jeopardy, though.

San Jose Mercury News Headlines April 15 – 16 2014: home prices to buy or rent are rising steeply

Flashback Friday!

As I was going through old blog posts, I found this brief installment from April 17th, 2014. Often I write that the current hot sellers market in the Bay is “prolonged,” “steady,” or “persistent,” but seeing these two headlines from over 3 years ago really shows just how unyielding it has been. It is highly unusual to be in such a strong, drawn-out market, but there’s no clear indicator that things will change anytime soon, either. Buyers and renters might find some relief now that autumn is here in hopes that it brings the usual seasonal cooling.

Find the original post immediately below. – Update October 22nd, 2017

 

Here are the headlines from the San Jose Mercury News in mid April 2014:

Home Prices to buy or rent going up April 15-16 2014

Rental article: Bay Area apartment rents set record 4/16/14

Excerpt:  Bay Area apartment rents are rising at nearly double-digit annual rates and have reached record levels, according to a report released Tuesday, prompting some analysts to warn that the region’s economic boom could be choked off by the relentless rise…..  Among the Bay Area’s three largest cities, San Jose had an average asking rent of $2,066 during this year’s January-March quarter, up 10.3 percent from the same period last year, RealFacts reported. Oakland had an average rental rate of $2,187, up 12.3 percent, while San Francisco posted an average of $3,057, up 9.5 percent.

Home buying article:   Bay Area home prices jump year over year

Excerpt:  March marked more than 20 consecutive months of year-over-year price gains for single-family homes in the East Bay, South Bay and Peninsula, according to real estate information service DataQuick, which released a report on March sales Wednesday…. The San Diego-based company said that prices were up 29.2 percent from the previous March in Alameda County to $575,000. In Contra Costa County, prices rose 22.8 percent to $425,000. Santa Clara County gained 20.3 percent to $800,000, and San Mateo County was up 13.2 percent to $860,000.

Whether you buy or rent, prices have been rising dramatically.  When factoring in what housing will cost, include the trajectory of appreciation per month.

What do Silicon Valley view homes cost?

211 Westhill Drive, Los Gatos - gorgeous Silicon Valley view homePerhaps you love – even need – a good view in order to feel happy with your new home in a new place.  We don’t have a lot of water views in Silicon Valley, though there are some of the San Francisco Bay in places. What’s easier to find are views of the hills or views of the valley from the views.  What do these Silicon Valley view homes cost?

Naturally a lot of the answer has to do with location, home size, condition of the property, and land value.  In general, it’s difficult to find a house with valley views for less than $2 million unless the property needs a lot of remodeling, repairs, and updating OR is in a very remote location.

Right now, I have a gorgeous Los Gatos view home for sale in the Belgatos area. It is in great condition and features 4 bedrooms, 3 bathrooms, and about 3,000 SF of living space close to Belgatos Park in east Los Gatos, which is a “close in” location, not out in the boondocks. It’s a remodeled, single story house, stunning condition with a pool and spa, and the list price is $2,288,000.  (You can check it out here: 211 Westhill Drive, Los Gatos CA 95030.) Los Gatos is a bargain by Silicon Valley standards. If you haven’t spent much time there, I’d invite you to check it out!

Take that same house and move it to Saratoga with Saratoga, and the price would be substantially more expensive, and more still in Los Altos.  Silicon Valley view homes vary in condition, size, parcel size, and many other factors. In most cases, the properties which are move-in ready will run between $2,000,000 at the low end to $5,000,000.  Supersized estates and land may well cost more.  We see homes in Santa Clara County priced up to $20 million at times, and on The Peninsula with much higher ceilings.

 

Silicon Valley’s Apartment Rental Market

keyWhether you’re a long-term renter, temporary renter looking for a furnished rental, or a landlord, you’re probably wondering how the Silicon Valley’s apartment rental market is today and where it’s heading. Most real estate agents in this area do not deal with rentals, so rental housing is not typically something we track super closely. That being said, the same things that affect the residential resale market frequently effect the apartment rental market as well. So, without the help from my usual sources, such as the MLS (Multiple Listing Services), let’s look at what people are saying about the current trends.

Silicon Valley’s apartment rental market in the news

This February, bizjournals.com published three helpful articles, all written by Janice Bitters on the Silicon Valley’s apartment rental market. In these, she provides insight to investors with predictions for the market with some reflection on current and past trends. What to these articles express? That there has been high demand and rising rents for years, similar to the housing market. What she gleans from industry trends is that builders and landlords have been working very hard to fulfill the demand for luxury apartments, and that new developments in the high-end sector have begun to meet demand. With demand in the higher price point diminishing, she says, builders and landlords no longer have the same incentive to create rentals in this sector, and investors do not want to pursue the mid- to low-end rental market. Despite there still being a clear demand in lower-cost apartments, developers are unlikely to pursue that sector right now due to the high cost of land and construction.

To attract renters to the luxury units, landlords are offering concessions such as free month to rent. This suggests that, in the higher price point of the rental market, it’s cooled down and has swung towards the favor of renters after being hot for a long time. In housing terms, we would call this a shift from a seller’s market (the market is in the seller’s favor) to a buyer’s market (the market is in the buyer’s favor).  It’s true that with residential home sales, it’s also cooler in the luxury tier (over $3 million) than more moderately priced homes for sale.  Here are the articles where you can learn much more about the rental market:

https://www.bizjournals.com/sanjose/news/2017/02/06/reports-show-rental-cooloff-for-silicon-valley.html

https://www.bizjournals.com/sanjose/news/2017/02/09/pierce-apartments-san-jose-silicon-valley-market.html

https://www.bizjournals.com/sanjose/news/2017/02/17/with-bay-area-apartment-rents-headed-for-steep.html

(Check out the graph in this last article!)

Unfortunately, after a cool and wet winter market, rent growth rates exceeded last year this summer, making it a continued, hot market for landlords. According to Apartment List (an excellent resource for tracking the rental market by city), San Jose rent is up 2% from last year and up 0.5% from last month, with the median rent for a one bedroom at $2,060, and at $2,580 for a two bed unit. Comparatively, Apartment List states that San Francisco is the highest cost California city for rentals with the median price for a two bedroom at $3,060, which has remained stable since last year. They also compare the median two bed rental across other major cities in the lower 48 states, which show that San Jose in both growth and median price is higher than New York city. Needless to say, on their Renter Confidence Survey, San Jose rated F for Affordability (meanwhile garnering and A and an A- in jobs and weather respectively).

Sunnyvale rentals, like the purchase market, is higher than San Jose by a few hundred dollars (Apartment List states the medians as $2,230 for 1 bed and $2,800 for a two bed unit), and are up 3.1% since last year. A Santa Clara apartment will cost you more than San Jose (the whole city, there are higher and lower rent areas), but less than Sunnyvale. Campbell may be your best bet for a reasonable rent, decreasing 1.3% since last year, and the only one with a median rent under $2,000. Mountain View has seen huge yearly rent growth at a current 4.9%. Compare that to the national average of 2.9% and the California average of 4.2%. Despite the yearly growth, rentals are slightly more affordable here than in Santa Clara (the median is only about $30 less).

Apartment List does not analyze every city and town, nor do they study the difference between neighborhoods, such as comparing South San Jose with Willow Glen, but where they do give insight helps to show the major trends happening around the bay area. Check out Apartment List for more detailed analysis, and the most up-to-date information on the market. Also check out their Rentonomics page with more articles on renting.

https://www.apartmentlist.com/ca/san-jose#guide

https://www.apartmentlist.com/ca/sunnyvale#guide

https://www.apartmentlist.com/ca/santa-clara#guide

https://www.apartmentlist.com/ca/campbell#guide

https://www.apartmentlist.com/ca/mountain-view#guide

https://www.apartmentlist.com/rentonomics/national-rent-data

https://www.apartmentlist.com/rentonomics/

Is there a solution to the lack of low-cost apartment rentals?

Analysts all believe there will be some market turnaround in the not too far future, but there are a few answers to where it may come from. CNBC published an article on the housing shortage dealing with high tech companies. Large industry leaders such as Google, Facebook, and Twitter continue to hire, bringing people into the area more quickly than developers are building, and forcing up the prices in both housing and rental markets. Employees have asked these companies to help, and some are responding. Google and Facebook have both come up with plans to construct affordable housing.

https://www.cnbc.com/2017/06/14/google-spending-30-million-on-housing-for-silicon-valley-employees.html

For years, California law has stated that a certain amount of affordable housing must be available in each community. Unfortunately, many communities are ignoring both the law and the need for such developments. If every community were to develop what the law required, the market would be much more balanced. Yet again, it’s the investors that are controlling the development, and it will not likely happen soon.

 

Relocating from San Francisco to Silicon Valley

Coit Tower in San Francisco

Coit Tower in San Francisco

How hard could relocating from San Francisco to Silicon Valley be? It’s the same time zone, the same “San Francisco Bay Area” region, and depending on which part of Silicon Valley you target, the drive time could be all of 20 minutes – or perhaps well over an hour.

Relocating from San Francisco to Silicon Valley can be a little bit of a culture shock, which is surprising given the close proximity of the two areas.  What’s so different?

(1) Most noticeably, the scenery is different.

You won’t be seeing the Golden Gate Bridge,  facing frighteningly steep hills, or catching a view of the Pacific Ocean from the Cliff House when you’re in Silicon Valley. Nob Hill, the Wharf, Ghirardelli Square, Union Square, Market Street, Mission Dolores, the SOMA district and so many other colorful parts of the city will be places you visit on weekends rather than drop in on some evening for supper. The scenic beauty of San Francisco may be the thing you will miss the most if you move out of that fabled city.

Beauty isn’t absent from Silicon Valley, though!  There are views of the San Francisco Bay in many places (Foster City and Redwood Shores especially).  Scenic vistas of the beautiful Santa Cruz Mountains can be enjoyed from many locations in the South Bay, especially Los Altos, Cupertino, Saratoga, Los Gatos, and the Almaden Valley in San Jose. Part of Silicon Valley reaches into North San Jose, Milpitas, and Fremont, where views of the eastern foothills can be quite lovely, too.  Some of these communities have a high elevation and can see the bay as well as the valley.

San Mateo County - Crystal Springs path by water

San Mateo County – Crystal Springs path by water

If you are relocating from San Francisco to Silicon Valley, you’ll want to be outdoors more and enjoy the many open spaces available to you. Parks and hiking areas abound on the Peninsula and in Santa Clara County. For example, you’ve probably driven past Crystal Springs Reservoir many times- but did you know that you can hike there?  Santa Clara County has a network of trails following various creeks.  The Los Gatos Creek Trail (with some adjacent percolation ponds) runs from Lexington Reservoir down into the valley, stopping at Meridian Avenue. There are also trails around parts of the bay – and eventually trails should ring the whole SF Bay Area, but that may take quite awhile.

At Vasona Lake County Park in Los Gatos you can rent a paddle boat and roam the lake in style! Or how about sauntering on horseback in the low foothills of Saratoga at Garrod’s? A day at Filoli in Woodside is always good for the soul – lovely places to walk around both outdoors and in. (Really spectacular during the holidays, too.)

Got wine?  You’ll get great views if you take in some wine tasting in Saratoga (several spots, also at Cooper-Garrod’s if you want to sip wine after riding horses) or Cupertino at Ridge Vineyards, too. There are dozens of wineries in Silicon Valley, including J Lohr near the San Jose airport.

Lovely sights are bountiful in The ValleyContinue reading

Shared housing

Looking for shared housing in urban areaShared housing is a way that many Silicon Valley employees work around the high cost of renting a home here.  A bonus is that if you’re relocating to the San Jose – Cupertino – Palo Alto area or nearby, it’s that much easier to meet people in a communal living situation.  For many, that means renting a house with a number of other people.  In some cases, it translates renting a bedroom in a house where the only other residents are members of the same family. Either way, it helps to beat the high real estate costs, and may enable those who choose to live in a group setting to save faster to buy their own home.

To many, shared housing seems like a new concept, but I remember doing it when I was just out of college and teaching in the Los Angeles area, where rents seemed sky high to me at the time.  When I returned to grad school, I did it again.  Both experiences, though, convinced me that a longer commute and living along OR a shorter commute and living in a smaller space (a studio apartment) was a good trade off.  Of course, this was in the 1980s, and we did not have web tools to help us to screen and find like minded roommates or house mates. I suspect it’s a lot better now.

Not having used any of these shared housing services, I cannot endorse any, but there are a number of sites to find house mates or communal living, and there are some companies which specialize in matching people to openings. If any of my readers can endorse a company or site, please let me know by email and I’ll update this article with that information.  My word of caution, though: never send money by wire to someone you don’t know for an apartment or home  you have  not seen. There is a very serious problem with wire fraud, and you do not want to put your hard earned money at risk. Be safe out there!

Read more on the Silicon Valley real estate market:

Read about the various real estate markets by area within Silicon Valley: http://sanjoserealestatelosgatoshomes.com/

Get market stats for San Mateo County, Santa Clara County, and Santa Cruz County: http://popehandy.rereport.com

 

Silicon Valley neighborhoods

This website, Move2SiliconValley.com, provides an overview for people thinking of or planning to move to Silicon Valley. If you want to dig deeper and learn about individual Silicon Valley neighborhoods, I want to suggest that you visit some of my other websites and blogs for Silicon Valley real estate resources.  Please have a look:

popehandy.com is my flagship site for Silicon Valley real estate – it includes area or neighborhood profiles for all the Silicon Valley communities (in all 4 counties) as well as information for Silicon Valley home sellers and more. Visit popehandy.com and click on “Communities” for a drop down menu listing the 4 counties and learn about the cities, towns, and areas that comprise the Silicon Valley area. (I run several sites and have many articles on them, and this is the one which covers the broadest territory.)
popehandy.com Silicon Valley neighborhoods

ValleyOfHeartsDelight.com is where I showcase my listings, and it’s the site for general real estate info in Santa Clara County and Santa Clara Valley, once known as the Valley Of Heart’s Delight. Most of Silicon Valley is in this area.

SanJoseRealEstateLosGatosHomes.com covers real estate in the town of Los Gatos and the nearby areas of San Jose, Campbell, Saratoga and more. I think it’s the best part of the Santa Clara Valley or Santa Clara County, but perhaps I’m biased. There are MANY posts with local market trends & statistics, updated monthly, for these areas plus Cupertino, Sunnyvale, Mountain View, Almaden Valley, Blossom Valley, Willow Glen, and so on – areas within Santa Clara County. (Google “real estate market” plus the city or area you’re interested in, and you likely will find an article on this site for your desired corner of the region.) Additionally, there are special research postings on the absorption rate in Los Gatos and Saratoga. Also you’ll find Silicon Valley neighborhoods described in depth, often at the subdivision level for areas such as Cambrian and Almaden. Check it out, it is a wealth of information!

For example, here’s an article on the Happy Valley neighborhood, also known as the Country Lane neighborhood:
Happy Valley neighborhood, Country Lane neighborhood – west San Jose

LiveInLosGatosBlog.com focuses on the town of Los Gatos, its neighborhoods, areas, districts, as well as events, parks, real estate for sale, the arts, schools, businesses, restaurants, and much more.  A little more community and a little less real estate, but the BEST site for Los Gatos neighborhoods you’ll find anywhere. Los Gatos was once known as the “gem city” and is still a very beloved corner of Silicon Valley today, with historic neighborhoods and homes, gorgeous architecture, and a vibrant downtown. Before deciding where to live, be sure to investigate this scenic town snuggled at the base of the Santa Cruz Mountains – the gateway to the valley.

popehandy.ReReport.com is all about the statistics for Silicon Valley, including San Mateo County, Santa Clara County, and Santa Cruz County. Overall, it is very comprehensive. It features a way for you to track listings and sales near your own home, or one of interest, too.

Silicon Valley neighborhoods where I focus my real estate sales:

Obviously, 4 counties is a lot of ground to cover, and most Realtors don’t work that huge of an area in urban communities like ours. I have sold in all 4 counties, but the vast majority of my business is in Santa Clara County, where I live and where my office is located.

In general, I avoid taking on buyers in counties outside of Santa Clara County as it’s far with today’s traffic and with buyer clients it’s important to be super responsive and see new listings as soon as they are available. For that reason, I’d be happy to introduce you to a great buyer’s agent in those areas if that’s where you’d like to purchase a home. With listings it’s far fewer trips and I have more control of my time, so I’m happy to assist sellers in all of these counties.

What are the usual open house times in Silicon Valley?

Open House signs when to whenIMG 1507 3b 212x300 - What are the usual open house times in Silicon Valley?If you are house hunting in Silicon Valley and new to the area, you may wonder when the usual open house times are. Unfortunately, open house times are not perfectly predictable as there is variation both from one brokerage or agent to the next and one region of the counties that comprise Silicon Valley to the next as well. As an example, in the Blossom Valley area of San Jose, condos or houses are frequently available for viewing between 1:30 and 4:30, but it’s not a rule – some listings may have a totally different schedule!

In general, most open houses will be available between 2 and 4 on weekend days if advertised as open (sometimes Saturday, sometimes Sunday, sometimes both. Open houses can run from 12-5, 2-4, 1-4, 1:30 – 4:30, 2-5 etc. If you arrive between 2 and 4 (not “at” 4), you are likely to find it open if it’s advertised as such.  Some real estate agents may hold it open sooner or later, though. If a Realtor has a couple of properties that need to be held open for the public, one could be from 11-1 and the other from 3-5 or some such schedule.

The broker open house is usually not intended for the public, but for agents to show listings to other agents who are looking for their clients. Occasionally (more frequently now than before), the home is open to the public to view. Broker open home tours take place on weekday mornings, typically Wednesday, between approximately 9:30am and 12:30pm.  If non real estate professionals (the public) are welcome, it will be advertised on our MLS, so check online or with your agent.

It is always best to check online at www.MLSListings.com for the most accurate schedule for open houses, which may be during weekday mornings, twilight tours, or weekend afternoons or mornings.

Finally, do not count on all properties listed for sale in Santa Clara or San Mateo Counties to necessarily be available for viewing at an open house. Some listing agents and some sellers prefer NO open houses, believing that any qualified buyer who’s serious will be working with a buyer’s agent and can make an appointment to see it privately. (This is yet another reason why every buyer should have his or her own real estate agent rather than planning to work with the listing agent when buying their next home.)

Urban Living Neighborhoods in Silicon Valley and San Jose

The Silicon Valley and San Jose areas are seeing a resurgence in the popularity of “urban living” neighborhoods. If you are looking to rent or buy a home in one of these areas, you may wonder where you can find them.

For those not familiar with the “urban living” name, it refers to areas where homes and shops are close together, so that residents are not so dependent upon cars. Some sites refer to them as “walk to town,” though that phrase is used less now to be inclusive of non-ambulatory citizens.

Here’s a quick list of areas to consider if you want the urban living experience:

(1) Downtown San Jose

In the downtown district of San Jose, you will find both new high rise condos (several were built all at once), ranging from nice to extremely upscale & elegant. Additionally, there are some neighborhood in or near downtown with houses full of character and architectural charm as they were built in about the 1920s. Once such neighborhood is Japan Town, where many of the homes are Spanish or Mediterranean style, and there’s a little “downtown” area (apart from the more congested, sky scraper area) with wonderful shops and restaurants. San Jose’s Japantown, by the way, is one of only 3 in the country – all of which are in California. The others are in Los Angeles and San Francisco.

Read more about San Jose’s Japantown in my blog through the link.

Find my San Jose Real Estate Market Update through the link.

(2) The Willow Glen area of San Jose

Willow Glen was once its own town but has been incorporated with San Jose for nearly a hundred years. Downtown Willow Glen is found along Lincoln Avenue between Bird and Minnesota. The area is old (some homes are Victorian and date back to the late 1800s) and many of the houses there are from the early part of the 20th century. There are some newer places, though, including apartments, condos and townhouses.

Find my Willow Glen Real Estate Market Update through the link.

(3) CampbellCampbell water tower

The city of Campbell is south of San Jose and borders it. It enjoys a lovely and popular downtown area along Campbell Avenue, clo
se to the Los Gatos Creek trail, parks and a par course, and also within a short jaunt to the Pruneyard Shopping Center. This part of the valley has both older homes (again dating back to the Victorian home era) as well as newer, and an added bonus is that the metro area’s light rail comes right into Campbell.

Find my Campbell Real Estate Market Update through the link.

(4) Los Gatos

A bit closer to the hills from Campbell is the town of Los Gatos, snuggling up to the base of the foothills. I have written about Los Gatos extensively on my Live in Los Gatos blog, as this is where I live. The downtown area is extremely beautiful and vibrant – and costly!  As with most “urban living” areas, it’s much less expensive the further out you get.

View a slideshow of Los Gatos (and links to more slideshows from there) courtesy of Mary Pope-Handy.

Find my Los Gatos Real Estate Market Update and the Market Trends by Price Point and High School District through the links.

(5) Saratoga

A little north of Los Gatos, Saratoga is also up against the coastal range so is very scenic. Saratoga is smaller and quieter, and many would say also more upscale. The schools in Saratoga are fantastic so most people moving there today do so for the schools. Prices are extremely high by Silicon Valley standards, but those who live in Saratoga will insist it’s worth it! The downtown area is lovely and full of wonderful places to dine as well as three for wine tasting.

Enjoy a slideshow of downtown Saratoga Village (photos and show by Mary Pope-Handy, link will open in a new window)

Find my Saratoga Real Estate Market Trends by Price Point and High School District through the link.

(6) Mountain View

If you love to dine out, you will find your way to Mountain View sooner or later! Like Los Gatos, the downtown Mountain View area is very vibrant and not terribly small. It’s right along the Cal Train route too so is a fabulous commute location for anyone going up the peninsula or to San Francisco.

Find my Mountain View Real Estate Market Update through the link.

(7) Palo Alto

Adjacent to Mountain View, and immensely expensive, is the very impressive city of Palo Alto. Home to Stanford University and some of the best schools in the nation, the downtown area also boasts wonderful eateries, shops, a classic movie theater, and much more. Everyone loves Palo Alto.  The only trick is affording it!

I don’t do regular market updates for Palo Alto, but occasionally I will compare it to other South Bay markets. See Comparing cost of housing in West Valley communities from Palo Alto to Los Gatos to Blossom Valley: what will a 4 bedroom home cost?

(8) Santa Clara’s Rivermark Area

The city of Santa Clara destroyed its original downtown many decades ago, so the main part of that fine city unfortunately has a “generic American” look to it now, though there are some lovely residential areas with beautiful older homes. A few years back, a new neighborhood was designed and built at the northern part of Santa Clara near the bay (on the land formerly housing the Agnews Developmental Center): Rivermark (just off River Oaks Parkway). The area includes a big retail area with a grocery store, banks, shops and restaurants, a park, several types of housing (apartments, condos, townhomes and houses). There is a private school in the neighborhood, too. (The local public schools are not noted for high scores.) Most of the homes in the area were built between 2005 and 2009, so the neighborhood is very popular with those who strongly desire to buy new construction.

Find my Santa Clara Real Estate Market Update through the link.

(9) Santana Row

Like Rivermark, Santana Row is a newer development but this one is in a well-established area at the intersection of Winchester Blvd and Stevens Creek Blvd, right where the cities of Santa Clara and San Jose meet. This is San Jose’s answer to Rodeo Drive – it’s where you’ll find the Gucci, Brooks Brothers, Coach and other similar stores. The complex is mixed use with shops below and apartments, townhouses and condos above. It’s young, it’s lavish, it’s European feeling – so as you might expect, this upscale area is not inexpensive! Whether you buy or rent a home there or just spend a weekend (there is a hotel) or an evening, it’s a great place to hang out, dine, stroll, shop and people watch. A grocery store is a mere block away and a movie theater tops off the attractions here, so this neighborhood truly seems to have it all.

A description of Santana Row with Slideshow (will open in a new window) by Mary Pope-Handy.

Find my San Jose Real Estate Market Update through the link.

 

Mary Pope-Handy
Realtor,
CIPS, CRS, ABR, SRES
Sereno Group
214 Los Gatos-Saratoga Rd.
Los Gatos CA 95030
[Silicon Valley, California, USA]
1-408-204-7673
mary (at) popehandy.com
CA BRE # 01153805

CIPS - Certified International Property Specialist
CRS - Certified Residential Specialist
ABR - Accredited Buyer Representative
SRES - Seniors Real Estate Specialist

Helping nice folks to buy and sell homes in Silicon Valley since 1993. Mary Pope-Handy, Realtor, Silicon Valley
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Real estate in Santa Clara County, focused on west side communities of San Jose, Los Gatos, Saratoga, Campbell & nearby

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Listings by Price Range
Below please find a list of SOME of the popular Silicon Valley areas with listings offered by price range. This is not a complete list! Please use the "search" app to find ALL properties on the MLS.
Trends & Statistics

Click the link below to get real estate data for Santa Clara County, San Mateo County, and Santa Cruz County (together making up about 98% of "Silicon Valley").

Real Estate Market Statistics and Trends for Santa Clara County


Comps near any address in Santa Clara County
Listings and Sales Near Any Address in Santa Clara County